About Evan Simpson

Evan Simpson

I am a Heart of Texas bankruptcy lawyer.

When I moved to Waco, the oldest of my children was in elementary school, I was just starting my career as a computer programmer, and it was my first real trip west of the Mississippi. Since them, I have worked in Waco, Temple, Killeen, and Austin, and traveled all around central Texas. My kids have grown up here; all but the youngest of my kids have moved out and headed off to college.

In 2005, I decided to make a major career change. I applied and was accepted at Baylor Law School. The next three years were quite exciting for my family, and incredibly busy for me, not least because I was still working half time as a computer programmer. I graduated with honors (Magna Cum Laude) and immediately passed the bar. I officially became a Texas lawyer on November 2, 2007. I soon opened my law office, doing criminal defense work to get myself established.

The economy hit my extended family hard in 2008, as it did so many other families. We had to struggle to live within our means. By the end of the year, two close relatives decided to file bankruptcy.

There was a silver lining to the family financial crisis: it led to me to bankruptcy law. My relatives introduced me to the attorney that they hired to file their bankruptcy case. She was impressed with my credentials, and I was fascinated by my glimpse of consumer bankruptcy law, so I joined her firm as an associate attorney.

In the time I spent working there, I learned a huge amount, not only about the law and practice of bankruptcy, but about the people who came to us for help. Every last one was at their wits end, because they had tried just about everything else they could think of before turning to us. They didn't want to be there. They wanted to pay their debts. They worried that they could lose everything. And with very few exceptions, I found, we could help them. In almost every consultation, I listened, explained what bankruptcy can do (and more importantly, the bad things it doesn't do!), and knew at the end that I had eased a burden. People went away knowing that they finally had a real solution to their problems. It couldn't have felt more different from my criminal defense practice (which was important work, but rarely pleasant, much less uplifting).

I decided to start my own bankruptcy practice in August 2009. It was extremely satisfying, and during the year or so that I operated on my own, I was able to help dozens of families deal with debts that they could no longer manage on their own. But my resources were limited, and so I was not able to reach nearly as many people in need as I would have liked.

Then, in December 2010, I was approached by the Jeff Davis Law Firm. They offered me the chance to help dozens of families per month, and I immediately accepted.